Southeastern Carpenters

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It's Hot. Do You Know How to Protect Yourself?

Soaring temperatures and construction projects are not a great mix. All members are urged to be mindful of their health when working in this Summer heat. OSHA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention both have a lot of great information for preventing heat illness for construction workers. Here’s some immediate steps you can take to stay safe…

Know What You Are Dealing With:

Heat stroke, the most serious form of heat-related illness, happens when the body becomes unable to regulate its core temperature. Sweating stops and the body can no longer rid itself of excess heat. Signs include confusion, loss of consciousness, and seizures. Heat stroke is a medical emergency that may result in death! Call 911 immediately.

Heat exhaustion is the body's response to loss of water and salt from heavy sweating. Signs include headache, nausea, dizziness, weakness, irritability, thirst, and heavy sweating.

Heat cramps are caused by the loss of body salts and fluid during sweating. Low salt levels in muscles cause painful cramps. Tired muscles—those used for performing the work—are usually the ones most affected by cramps. Cramps may occur during or after working hours.

Heat rash, also known as prickly heat, is skin irritation caused by sweat that does not evaporate from the skin. Heat rash is the most common problem in hot work environments.

Stay Informed - There's an APP for that

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has a FREE APP to help you stay informed and diligently guard against heat illness. The “OSHA-NIOSH Heat Safety Tool” can be downloaded to any iOS or Android device. It’s free. Takes just a minute to find and download, and could one day save a life. GET THE APP BY CLICKING HERE: https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/heatstress/heatapp.html

For more information about heat-related illnesses:

The goal of every Southeastern Carpenter is to arrive home after a shift in the same healthy state as when he or she left. Don’t underestimate the dangers of working improperly in this southern heat. Stay safe, everyone!